Unveiled Faces: Artists Reflecting God’s Glory

October 2010
by Maria Fee

“Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. And we,
who with unveiled faces all reflect the Lord’s glory, are being transformed into his likeness
with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is Spirit.” – 2 Corinthians 3: 17,18
 
Redeemer’s fall art exhibi tion, entitled Unveiled Faces, enables artists to share their work and give the art patron who attends Redeemer the occasion to support the artists and the RENEW campaign (half of the proceeds of what is sold benefit Redeemer’s move to four congregations.) Please join us in celebrating Unveiled Faces at the artists’ reception on Friday, October 22 from 6:30PM to 9:30PM at the Redeemer Offices. 
 
In the Old Testament Moses had to veil his face to hide the glory that emanated from him after being in the presence of God. Following the reconciliation that Christ’s death brought between God and his people, however, Paul tells us that we no longer need to veil the glory of God’s transformation in our lives. And we, who with unveiled faces all reflect the Lord’s glory, are being transformed into his likeness with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is Spirit.” 2 Corinthians 3: 17,18
 
What does this mean for artists? To start with, artists can invite the Spirit’ transformational power into their creative process. Like prayer, art making can be dialogical. Artists not only converse with their materials and mediums, but also grapple with God. As we shape and change our creations we grow in our understanding of how the Spirit forms and transforms. Making art is a grace act—what we receive and generate is all gift. But creating is also a faith act. We must believe that God is somehow involved. 
 
Moses covered the evidence of time spent with God. Through the ministry of the Spirit, the willing artist exposes his or her time with God. Christian artists must also believe that God can use art in ways one never expected or can ever explain. Just as God’s glory was clearly present on Moses’ face we must believe, if God so chooses, that his glory can be seen through our art. Through Christ, art acquires import other than self-expression. For the Christian, art can help communicate the depth and meaning of transformation, glory, hope, and redemption. And finally, art is public; it carries a social component. Of course, it can separate and divide but it can also bring together. 
 
Join us to see works of art unveiled.


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